Waiting For Dawn

By admin - November 17th, 2014

Waiting For Dawn

Written By: Keera Ratnam
I was told at nightfall the days ends, and with the morning sun, comes a new day and new experience. But to me, a new day means much more than waking up to see the sun. It means freedom. It is a day where the children of tomorrow are able to speak their native tongue. A day where our lives are protected from harm and a day, where we truly are free.

That day has not yet come. My people, the Tamil people, and I have been suffering from physical and mental torture. We’ve been stripped our rights and privileges – and have become muted. Despite all the suffering, we are not able to speak our voices. Why, you may ask? Why we have not spoke out? But the truth is, we are not allowed to speak. And when we do try to let our voices be heard, it is silenced. From the tiniest quarrel from our youngest living to the last standing alive.

But do not worry, my brothers and sisters are not hopeless. We too believe that we will be free one day. We left our homes, family and dreams in search of a new day and to bring a day of light to our people. We are the children of today, we must work to give light to the ones that will rise tomorrow. We took oath. An oath to fight till the end, and we must vow to fight, from dawn till dusk, until a new horizon is risen. We walked many miles, up many hills, dug many bunkers, fled from forest to forest, and fled from house to house. We held on to every mother and father, and promised to protect them as our own. We watched our friends cry in pain, fall within our arms asking us to hold on tight, tighter. We carried the dead, to put them to rest, and took them home for their families to see. Mothers yelled, cried and fell down to their feet. Asking their child’s body if they can have the one last chance to meet, talk, hug.

Many of us lost arms and legs. Many lost their lives and some gave up their livelihood. They did not rest, they did not stop, they went on as each fighter fell. As death came closer, they said, beneath the ground we shall go, but will up-rise again as young springs and continue on with our journey until the rays of sunlight from tomorrow shines upon us with delight. From Dawn till Dusk we shall not sleep, beneath the ground we shall not rest, until the day has come for the birth of our nation.



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We must never forget. The significance of our Maveerarkal and Kaarthikai Poo.

By admin - November 8th, 2014

We must never forget. The significance of our Maveerarkal and Kaarthikai Poo.

We must never forget. The significance of our Maveerarkal and Kaarthikai Poo.

Written by: Mathusan Mahalingam

karthikaiThe month of Karthaikai, November, marks great significance for us Eelam Tamils around the globe. November is a month dedicated to commemorating our Maveerarkal, and their selfless sacrifices for our nation.

Many Tamil Student Associations at various universities and colleges work in organizing numerous programs that seek to educate peers of the sacrifices of our Maveerarkal, and to commemorate them. Through musicals, dramas, speeches, poetry readings and alternative campaigns, Canadian Tamil youth accept their responsibility of educating and respecting the tremendous sacrifices of our Maveerarkal.

Every year, partaking in such events, brings me a sense of peace, hope and strength. Every year without fail, through such events, I am reminded again, of the humble, and selfless sacrifices of our brothers and sisters, and realize their undeniable love for our Motherland, Tamileelam.

This month, the Kaarthikai Poo, is also worn proudly by many. The Kaarthikai Poo was designated as the Tamil Eelam National Flower in 2003. The Kaarthikai Poo contains the spectrum of colours of the Tamileelam National Flag – Red, and Yellow. Furthermore, in the month of November, this flower blooms throughout the Tamil homeland, in the north and the east.

In English, the Karthikai Poo is known as the ‘Glorisa Lily’, or alternatively as the Flame Lily. Some of the properties of the flower itself are quite remarkable and inspirational. Unlike other flowers that quickly wither when cut and placed in flower within a few days, the Karthikai Poo can survive and endure for up to four weeks when cut and placed in water.

But, what is most astounding of this flower, is that it symbolizes regeneration and rebirth. Once the flower has bloomed once, the growth tip of the bulb of the flower actually grows another fork tuber, producing another bulb, and another flower. The Kaarthikai Poo, in its properties, produces two other bulbs, and thus two new flowers from its seed. So from each flower, comes two new flowers. A powerful analogy can be drawn from this property to our Maveerarkal, who become seeds of revolution and hope in their passing, and thus, using the Kaarthikai Poo as a symbol, is truly powerful.

Assigning specific flowers as state flowers, or national flowers is a tradition that has been practiced for many centuries, the assigning of flowers to symbolic significance began with the assigning of specific deities specific flowers. This tradition is carried out today, where nations, and states continue to assign flowers of significance to commemorate specific occasions, or to particular nations.

This month especially, we must all come together at these events, and show our respect for our Maveerarkal, and we must all wear the Kaarthikai Poo proudly. If your school is organizing an event, go to it, show support and respect for our heroes. We must all educate our peers, and co-workers of their significance, and most of all, we must remember.

They gave up their lives so we could be free, and we must never forget them, but instead, move their dreams forward.

Source:

“Bulbs and Summer Flowering: Gloriosa Lily.” Garden Express. 2011. Retrieved from http://www.gardenexpress.com.au/gloriosa-lily/. November 01, 2011.



Lest We Forget

By admin - November 8th, 2014

Lest We Forget

Every year on November 11, Canadians honour the men and women who have served, and fought for Canada in the First World War (1914-1918), the Second World War (1939-1945), and the Korean War (1950-1953), as well as those who have served since then. More than 1,500,000 Canadians have served, and more than 100,000 have died. They gave their lives and their futures so that we may live in peace. Today, take a moment and thank the Canadians who have given up their lives for your freedom.

Like the Kaarthikai Poo, the poppy is worn as a symbol of remembrance throughout the month as a reminder of the sacrifice of the veterans. The idea of using the poppy as a means to support wounded veterans was an idea brought on by a French woman, Madame E. Guérin, who suggested the idea to British Field-Marshall Earl Haig. The first of these poppies were distributed in Canada in November of 1921, and the tradition has continued in Canada ever since.

All of us, growing up would have heard the heartfelt poem written by Lieutenant-Colonel John McCrae, a doctor serving with the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps:

In Flanders Fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.
John McCrae 11

The Canadian Tamil Youth Alliance encourages all its youth to take part in remembering and honouring the sacrifices of Canadian soldiers by wearing a poppy and taking part in the two minutes of silence on the 11th day, of the 11th month, of the 11th hour.

“Heroism is latent in every human soul – However humble or unknown, they (the veterans) have renounced what are accounted pleasures and cheerfully undertaken all the self-denials – privations, toils, dangers, sufferings, sicknesses, mutilations, life-” Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain

References:

Veterans Affairs Canada (http://www.vac-acc.gc.ca/



Call Out for CTYA Board of Directors

By admin - October 24th, 2014

Call Out for CTYA Board of Directors

Canadian Tamil Youth Alliance (CTYA) is seeking dynamic individuals who are responsible, enthusiastic and creative to join our Board of Directors. We are seeking for candidates that can utilize their experience, skills, and passion to empower youth to provide new innovative ideas and enhance the delivery of our services.

CTYA will be holding elections for Board of Directors at our next Annual General Meeting that will be held on December 7th 2014.

The following positions are available for nomination:

Executive Committee:
President – 1 position
Vice President Communication – 1 position
Vice President Events – 1 position
Vice President External – 1 position
Vice President Finance – 1 position
Vice President Membership Development – 1 position

General Council:
Arts/Culture – 3 positions
Athletics – 3 positions
Education/Career Development – 3 positions
Human Rights Advocacy – 3 positions
Tamil Nation Development – 3 positions

General Council Values:

http://www.CTYA.org/english/councils.html

Basic Responsibilities:
• Regularly attends monthly board meetings and committee related meetings.
• Makes serious commitment to participate actively in developing the council and engaging membership.
• Volunteers to accept assignments and completes them thoroughly and on time.
• Stays informed about committee matters, prepare themselves well for meetings, and reviews and comments on minutes and reports.
• Gets to know other committee members and builds a collegial working relationship that contributes to consensus.
• Actively participates in the committee’s annual evaluation and planning efforts.

Basic Qualifications
• Must be an individual member of CTYA.
• In depth understanding of CTYA’s mission and accomplishments.
• Able to plan, manage and execute CTYA’s mission and vision in collaboration with
Board members, general members and the community.
• A strong dedication to empower youth.
• Strong leadership and communication skills.
• Ability to commit a minimum 3-5 hours per week.
• Team building skills and previous experience in a group atmosphere is an asset.

Please contact us at elections@ctya.org for nomination packages. All nominations must be submitted through e-mail by Saturday November 22nd, 2014.

Email: elections@ctya.org
Phone: 647-470-2892



Tamileelam Challenge Cup 2014 – Soccer

By admin - August 26th, 2014

Tamileelam Challenge Cup 2014 - Soccer

It is that time of year again, when your favourite soccer teams come together to the most anticipated soccer tournament of the year, Tamileelam Challenge Cup! Tamileelam Challenge Cup 2013 will be hosted by the Athletic Council of Canadian Tamil Youth Alliance in partnership with Canadian Tamil Sports Association (CTSA). This year the tournament will be taking place on Saturday August 30th, 2014.

This tournament not only strives to develop leadership skills and good sportsmanship among our youth but gives our youth an opportunity to maintain our identity through sports. To encourage the Tamil identity, the awards for best players of the tournament will be given under the names of national symbols of Tamil Eelam; Vaahaibeing the national Tree; Siruththai being the national animal; and Chenbagam being the national bird.

Tamileelam Challenge Cup 2014 will be our sixth annual tournament making it an even more extraordinary event. The one day tournament will feature youth games from under 8 to under 14. It will also feature the always competitive Under 16 cup and the Open Men’s cup. If you are interested in playing in this year’s Tamileelam Challenge Cup 2014 please email us at atheletics@ctya.org.

Don’t miss out on this year’s exciting, competitive games at the Tamileelam Challenge Cup 2014!



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